theparisreview:

“Recently I took my iPad to a park across a lake, sat under a tree facing the water, and started reading the e-book version of Walden, Henry David Thoreau’s classic avowal of the possibility of, as well as the necessity for, simplicity amid modern life’s profusion and superfluity. Cognitive dissonance doesn’t get much more dissonant than this.”
Dannie Zarate on Thoreau in the modern age.

theparisreview:

“Recently I took my iPad to a park across a lake, sat under a tree facing the water, and started reading the e-book version of Walden, Henry David Thoreau’s classic avowal of the possibility of, as well as the necessity for, simplicity amid modern life’s profusion and superfluity. Cognitive dissonance doesn’t get much more dissonant than this.”

Dannie Zarate on Thoreau in the modern age.

theparisreview:

“There are always beginnings and endings, springs and winters, whether those seasons call to mind the heavenly seasons of creation and restoration or only the human seasons of birth and death. The symbolism of evergreen trees predates Christianity, and the Christmas trees of Eliot’s poem have meaning beyond their religiosity. The cultivation in the poem’s title is not really of trees, but of persons. Joy is born naturally, but it requires tending if it is to last.” 
Casey N. Cep on T. S. Eliot’s poem “The Cultivation of Christmas Trees.”

theparisreview:

There are always beginnings and endings, springs and winters, whether those seasons call to mind the heavenly seasons of creation and restoration or only the human seasons of birth and death. The symbolism of evergreen trees predates Christianity, and the Christmas trees of Eliot’s poem have meaning beyond their religiosity. The cultivation in the poem’s title is not really of trees, but of persons. Joy is born naturally, but it requires tending if it is to last.” 

Casey N. Cep on T. S. Eliot’s poem “The Cultivation of Christmas Trees.”

newyorker:

Sarah Miller imagines a series of positive book reviews: http://nyr.kr/IHXYjJ

“Moby-Dick,” by Herman Melville
“The characters are as rollicking and fun as the ocean setting. The narrator, Ishmael, is just a really good guy, while Ahab, a ship’s captain, allows us to remember that anger happens when we don’t process our sadness, which is every bit as precious as our joy. Ultimately, ‘Moby-Dick’ is a gripping story about a diverse group of men putting aside their differences to create lifelong friendships on a hand-crafted sailboat.”

Photograph by Kurt Hutton/Picture Post/Getty.

newyorker:

Sarah Miller imagines a series of positive book reviews: http://nyr.kr/IHXYjJ

“Moby-Dick,” by Herman Melville

“The characters are as rollicking and fun as the ocean setting. The narrator, Ishmael, is just a really good guy, while Ahab, a ship’s captain, allows us to remember that anger happens when we don’t process our sadness, which is every bit as precious as our joy. Ultimately, ‘Moby-Dick’ is a gripping story about a diverse group of men putting aside their differences to create lifelong friendships on a hand-crafted sailboat.”

Photograph by Kurt Hutton/Picture Post/Getty.