WOMEN IN ART - FRANS HALS

womengirls:

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Frans Hals (1580 - 1666) est un peintre baroque néerlandais, considéré, avec Rembrandt et Johannes Vermeer, comme l’un des plus importants du siècle d’or. Wikipédia

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ANNETTA HANNEMANS

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CATHERINA van der Eem

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CATHERINA HOOFT AVEC SON ENFANT

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PORTRAIT DE FAMILLE

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FEYNTJE van STEENKISTE

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BOHEMIENNE

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MALLE BABBE

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FEMME ASSISE AVEC UN EVENTAIL

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FEMME ASSISE

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FEMME DEBOUT

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FEMME A L’EVENTAIL

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PORTRAIT DE FEMME

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SCHROVETIDE REVELLERS

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JEUNE FILLE CHANTANT

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OFFICIAL LADIES

cavetocanvas:

Frans Hals, Willem Coymans, 1645
This is one of my favorite portraits by Hals; the personality that Coymans exudes is fantastic. With his fancy hat set at a rakish angle and his elbow hanging over the back of his chair, it looks like we’ve just interrupted the sitter, lending a wonderfully spontaneous quality to this image. Clearly Coymans was extremely proud of his long, flowing locks, as Hals pays special attention to the subtle shadows and highlights in their curls. Look at this portrait in high-res and notice the incredibly loose brushwork on the white cuff of Coyman’s sleeve; this is Hals at his finest. Up close it looks almost impressionistic, but from far away it coalesces into a beautiful costume.

cavetocanvas:

Frans Hals, Willem Coymans, 1645

This is one of my favorite portraits by Hals; the personality that Coymans exudes is fantastic. With his fancy hat set at a rakish angle and his elbow hanging over the back of his chair, it looks like we’ve just interrupted the sitter, lending a wonderfully spontaneous quality to this image. Clearly Coymans was extremely proud of his long, flowing locks, as Hals pays special attention to the subtle shadows and highlights in their curls. Look at this portrait in high-res and notice the incredibly loose brushwork on the white cuff of Coyman’s sleeve; this is Hals at his finest. Up close it looks almost impressionistic, but from far away it coalesces into a beautiful costume.

cavetocanvas:

Frans Hals, Married Couple, 1622
This portrait of a married couple is reminiscent of Rubens’ similar portrait of himself and his wife, Isabella Brandt: both paintings are set in an allegorical garden of love. However, Hals distinguishes himself through this portrait by the casualness of the figures; they are relaxed and at ease in the landscape. Although the man is placed on the heraldic right, as was customary for more important figures, Hals equalizes the woman by placing her in the center of the painting. The ivy vine along the bottom of the portrait is a symbol for marriage, while the thistles pictured symbolized luck in love.

cavetocanvas:

Frans Hals, Married Couple, 1622

This portrait of a married couple is reminiscent of Rubens’ similar portrait of himself and his wife, Isabella Brandt: both paintings are set in an allegorical garden of love. However, Hals distinguishes himself through this portrait by the casualness of the figures; they are relaxed and at ease in the landscape. Although the man is placed on the heraldic right, as was customary for more important figures, Hals equalizes the woman by placing her in the center of the painting. The ivy vine along the bottom of the portrait is a symbol for marriage, while the thistles pictured symbolized luck in love.

mediumaevum:

image: Buffon playing a Lute, Frans Hals
Instrument of the day: LUTE

'Now divine aire, now is his soule ravisht, is it not strange that sheepes guts should hale soules out of mens bodies?' —William Shakespeare, Much Ado about Nothing.
Shakespeare was only one of many writers of his day who attributed to the lute the power to transport the listener into a kind of ecstasy; for throughout the Renaissance the lute’s ravishing tone made it the most esteemed and admired of all musical instruments. The fame of the greatest players spread through all Europe, and the doors of royal courts and palaces were open to them (a number were consequently employed as spies) while instruments by the most famous makers could fetch astronomical sums.
All about the lute here.

mediumaevum:

image: Buffon playing a Lute, Frans Hals

Instrument of the day: LUTE

'Now divine aire, now is his soule ravisht, is it not strange that sheepes guts should hale soules out of mens bodies?' —William Shakespeare, Much Ado about Nothing.

Shakespeare was only one of many writers of his day who attributed to the lute the power to transport the listener into a kind of ecstasy; for throughout the Renaissance the lute’s ravishing tone made it the most esteemed and admired of all musical instruments. The fame of the greatest players spread through all Europe, and the doors of royal courts and palaces were open to them (a number were consequently employed as spies) while instruments by the most famous makers could fetch astronomical sums.

All about the lute here.